Architectural Features

An arch is a structure capable of spanning a space while supporting significant weight. Arches appeared as early as 2000 BC in Mesopotamian brick architecture.
A balustrade is a set of decorative moulded shafts (balusters) standing on a unifying footing and supporting the coping of a parapet or the handrail of a staircase.
Often associated with Victorian architecture, bay windows became popular around the 1870s and are used to increase the flow of light into buildings, and provide the illusion of a larger room.
Cladding is a thick layer of stone fixed to a building for either aesthetic or practical purposes (e.g. weatherproofing).
A pilaster is a column which projects only slightly from the wall, and is designed to give the impression of a supporting element. It has a base, a shaft, and a capital.
In architectural terms, a plinth is a base or platform upon which another structure rests, such as a column, monument or statue. A moulded plinth can also be a base for a wall or railings.
Quoins are the cornerstones of brick walls, and can be merely decorative, or genuine structural elements. Quoins are often used to give an additional impression of strength to a building.
Stone steps have two main components: treads and risers. A tread (the part that is stepped on) normally overlaps the riser beneath it, finished with a bullnose edge.
We design and manufacture stone window surrounds in all shapes, sizes and forms. They can be made with an arched or flat top, with simple flat profiles or more detailed mouldings.